Books – Writing

Reading William Gurnall – JC Ryle

For my own part, I can only say that I read everything I can get hold of which professes to throw light on my Master’s business, and the work of Christ among men. But, the more I read, the less I admire modern theology. The more I study the productions of the new schools of theological teachers, the more I marvel that men and women can be satisfied with such writings. There is a vagueness, a mistiness, a shallowness, an indistinctness, a superficiality, an aimlessness, a hollowness about the literature of the “broader and kinder systems”, as they are called, which to my mind stamps their origin on their face. They are of the earth, earthy. I find more of definite soul-satisfying thought in one page of Gurnall than in five pages of such books as the leaders of the so-called “Broad Church School” put forth. In matters of theology, the old is better.

– JC Ryle –
talking about William Gurnall’s book, “The Christian In Complete Armour” (dated April 23, 1864)

Praying Against Idols – Andrew Bonar

Tried this morning especially to pray against idols in the shape of my books and studies. These encroach upon my direct communion with God, and need to be watched.

– Andrew Bonar –
from Andrew Bonar: Diary & Life (Saturday, September 7, 1850)

Give Yourself to Reading – Charles Spurgeon

As the apostle says to Timothy, so also he says to everyone, “Give yourself to reading.” He who will not use the thoughts of other men’s brains proves that he has no brains of his own. You need to read. Renounce as much as you will all light literature, but study as much as possible sound theological works, especially the Puritanic writers, and expositions of the Bible. The best way for you to spend your leisure is to be either reading or praying.

– Charles Spurgeon –

What You Read – Oscar Wilde

It is what you read when you don’t have to that determines what you will be when you can’t help it.

– Oscar Wilde –

AW Tozer on Christian Books

The worst thing a book can do for a Christian is to leave him with the impression that he has received from it anything really good; the best it can do is to point the way to the Good he is seeking. … That book serves best which early makes itself unnecessary, just as a signpost serves best after it is forgotten, after the traveller has arrived safely at his desired haven.

– AW Tozer –