Richard Baxter

The Chief of God’s Promises – Richard Baxter

The Chief of God’s Promises – Richard Baxter

Christ promised His Spirit to all true believers, to be in them as his Advocate, Agent, Seal, and Mark; and indeed the Spirit here, and heaven hereafter, are the chief of His promises.

– Richard Baxter –
from Dying Thoughts, 1683

The First and Great Work of a Christian – Richard Baxter

The first and great work of a Christian is about his heart. There it is that God dwells by his Spirit, in his saints; and there it is that sin and Satan reign, in the ungodly. The great duties and the great sins are those of the heart. There is the root of good and evil: the tongue and life are but the fruits and expressions of that which dwells within.

– Richard Baxter –
1615 – 1691

Different From the Rest of Mankind – Richard Baxter

That this Spirit is given to all true believers is evident by the effects of his being given. They have ends, affections, and lives different from the rest of mankind; they live upon the hopes of a better life, and their heavenly interest overrules all the opposite interest of this world. In order to this they live under the conduct of divine authority, and to obey and please God is the great business of their lives.

– Richard Baxter –
from Dying Thoughts, 1683

Possession vs Preparation – Richard Baxter

The life to come depends upon this present life. As the life of adult age depends upon infancy, or the reward upon work; or the prize of racers or soldiers upon their running or fighting; or the merchant’s gain upon his voyage. Heaven is won or lost on earth; the possession is there, but the preparation is here.

– Richard Baxter – 
from Dying Thoughts, 1683

Godliness is a Joy and Pleasure – Richard Baxter

Will you say that godliness is unpleasant, because it makes a man sorry for his ungodliness?… Would you wish a man that hath lived so long in sin and misery, to have no sorrow for it in his return—especially when it is but a healing sorrow, preparing for remission, and not a sorrow joined with despair, as theirs will be that die impenitently?

– Richard Baxter –
1615-1691